High-end vehicle simulation: Ansible Motion chooses Heason Technology as motion control partner

Ansible Motion, a designer and manufacturer of advanced driver-in-the-loop simulators, has chosen Heason Technology as its motion control supplier.

Ansible’s heritage is closely associated with the motorsports industry, but nowadays also serving major road car and speciality vehicle manufacturers.

The company’s DIL solutions are available in a variety of form factors from test bench models with steering force feedback to highly dynamic 6 degrees of freedom simulators combining software, mechatronics, video and audio for a truly immersive multi-sensory experience.  Continue reading High-end vehicle simulation: Ansible Motion chooses Heason Technology as motion control partner

Ansible Motion developing defence against motion sickness for autonomous cars

autonomous cars

With more people set to be reading or using screens in their autonomous cars, Ansible Motion’s simulation technology could highlight what features could prevent sickness from happening

When self-driving cars become the norm, we’re going to have much more spare time, as we’ll no longer be chained to the steering wheel with our eyes locked on the road ahead.

This is brilliant news as we’ll have more time to read, work and play driving games on our phones instead. But it could have one downside: Motion sickness.

Motion sickness is already a problem for many passengers – and when we all become passengers, it seems inevitable that it’ll get worse. In fact, experts are already predicting that between 6 per cent and 12 per cent of Americans can expect to get sick travelling in an autonomous vehicle.  Continue reading Ansible Motion developing defence against motion sickness for autonomous cars

The role of humans in the testing of autonomous cars

autonomous car simulation

Ansible Motion develops driving simulators for autonomous car engineering, but with one important additional component — the human driver 

The interest in, and momentum assigned to, the introduction of autonomous cars may appear substantial to anyone catching articles in the media.

We can certainly find plenty of aspirational images of happy people reading books or watching films whilst travelling down the motorway.  Excellent.  But our lovely ‘digital living space’ will require substantial validation before we get down that road.

With hundreds of (computer) processors and sensors required to offer even simple driver assistance systems, signing off a fully autonomous car with any level of confidence is not going to be an easy assignment for vehicle manufacturers. And that sign off is going to need some human involvement. Continue reading The role of humans in the testing of autonomous cars