Interest and fascination grows about robots’ artistic talents

Captives #B04 from Quayola on Vimeo.

Industrial robots which are normally seen in factories making cars or some other heavy industrial object are increasingly shown as drawing or painting like artists. 

These days, with ever-more powerful artificial intelligence software driving the robots, it’s difficult to say if there’s anything left that robots cannot do.

The big question is probably, “Is there anything that humans can do that robots cannot?”

Continue reading Interest and fascination grows about robots’ artistic talents

Art created with Google DeepDream neural networks to feature in exhibition

google deepdreamArtists who have been experimenting with Google’s DeepDream source code – designed for visualisation using artificial intelligence techniques – are to display their work at an art exhibition.

Entitled DeepDream: The Art of Neural Networks, all the artworks in the exhibition are made using artificial neural networks, which are “a biologically inspired form of computing which, unlike classical computer algorithms, aren’t programmed directly by human operators but instead learn from large amount of example data”, according to the blurb on the website.

And the artworks do look computer-generated, although probably recognisable as being distinct from what you might achieve with a few filters in Photoshop. The exhibition will also feature an auction. Continue reading Art created with Google DeepDream neural networks to feature in exhibition

Kuka palletising robot becomes art exhibit

Kuka robot as art exhibit
Paratissima art fair: the palletizing robot from Kuka gives an excellent performance, even as a work of art

After 14 years of continuous operation, a Kuka palletizing robot took up a new function recently, appearing as an art exhibit at the Italian art fair Paratissima in Turin.

The palletizing robot used to be in charge of keeping things orderly: untiring, meticulous and reliable, the KUKA robot spent 14 years sorting boxes of hinges used in furniture production.

In November 2015, it gave up its role as a diligent organizer, embracing creative chaos instead. For this, professional body painters applied their skills to transforming the robot into a work of art.

The Kuka robot was on display at the renowned Italian art fair Paratissima in Turin.

“The project was an unusual opportunity for us to share our modern robot technology with a group of people with whom we would otherwise rarely come into contact,” enthused Gian Luca Branca, CEO of Kuka Italy.