Startup company Sea Machines developing self-driving technology for which can be added to traditional boats

sea-machines-self-driving-boat-tech

Boston-based startup Sea Machines is developing autonomous technologies that will enable traditional boats to become self-driving vessels. 

The company says its development heralds a smarter, safer and more efficient era of marine operations brought forward through self-aware and self-driving boats and ships.

With autonomy readily making its way into many traditional land-based and airborne sectors, the massive marine domain is even better suited for autonomous systems with fewer barriers to entry, a high risk operating environment, and an accommodating regulatory space.

More than 20 million vessels are plying the world’s waters including 15 million recreational boats and 100,000 cargo ships; Sea Machines foresees autonomy disrupting this largely manual sector and rapidly developing into a $60 billion space.  Continue reading Startup company Sea Machines developing self-driving technology for which can be added to traditional boats

Liquid Robotics ocean robot swims 3,000 miles to protect fish in Hawaii

liquid robotics wave rider

Liquid Robotics says its Wave Glider ocean robot swam 2,808 nautical miles (5,200 km) to the Big Island of Hawaii after successfully completing a four-month patrol mission of the Pitcairn Island Marine Sanctuary.

This achievement represents a fundamental enabling capability for unmanned systems as it proves the feasibility and flexibility of autonomous mission deployment.

Using the Wave Glider platform, Liquid Robotics’ customers are able to deploy sensors in the most remote marine locations without sending a large ship for recovery.  Continue reading Liquid Robotics ocean robot swims 3,000 miles to protect fish in Hawaii

Liquid Robotics’ ocean robots surpass one million nautical miles at sea

Liquid Ocean robotics vessel
Liquid Ocean robotics vessel

Liquid Robotics, which makes wave and solar powered ocean robots, says its fleets of Wave Gliders have reached 1 million nautical miles at sea—an important milestone for the unmanned surface vehicle (USV) industry.

The Wave Glider is the first USV to complete missions from the Arctic to the Southern Ocean, operate through 17 hurricanes/typhoons, and achieve a Guinness World Record for the “longest journey by an autonomous, unmanned surface vehicle on the planet”.

One million nautical miles is the equivalent to 1.29x round trip journey to the moon (at the moon’s furthest point) or approximately 46 times around the world.  Continue reading Liquid Robotics’ ocean robots surpass one million nautical miles at sea

Carnegie Mellon demonstrates autonomous helicopter and ground vehicle technology to US military

Carnegie Mellon demonstrated how autonomous aerial and ground vehicles can work together
Carnegie Mellon demonstrated how autonomous aerial and ground vehicles can work together
Robotics and automation experts at one of the world’s leading universities have demonstrated autonomous ground vehicles and aircraft with “new collaborative capabilities for keeping warfighters safe”.

Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Sikorsky, A Lockheed Martin Company, using a UH-60MU Black Hawk helicopter enabled with Sikorsky’s Matrix Technology and CMU’s Land Tamer autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV), recently participated in a joint autonomy demonstration that they say proved the capability of new, ground-air cooperative missions.

Such missions could prevent warfighters’ exposure to hazardous conditions, such as chemically or radiologically contaminated areas, say the experts. Continue reading Carnegie Mellon demonstrates autonomous helicopter and ground vehicle technology to US military

Sensors: ASI says advances bringing greater opportunities in autonomous vehicles

Raw point cloud data generated by ASI's Forcast lidar and analyzed by Vantage perception software
Raw point cloud data generated by ASI’s Forcast lidar and analyzed by Vantage perception software

Autonomous Solutions Inc (ASI) says advances in sensor technology is creating more opportunities in the autonomous vehicles sector, adding that the sensors are getting cheaper.

Each autonomous vehicle system employs a set of sensors that provide environmental feedback for safety, navigation, and other essential vehicle functions.

Up until this point, sensors with high levels of accuracy have been too expensive for most users to afford, but that is rapidly changing. Continue reading Sensors: ASI says advances bringing greater opportunities in autonomous vehicles