Infineon supplies CERN with sensors to detect dark matter

The giant atom-smashing machine at CERN
The giant atom-smashing machine at CERN

Dark matter is the mysterious and elusive target for the world’s scientists now

Ninety-five percent of the universe is still considered unexplored. Scientists at CERN, the world’s largest particle physics research center, located in Geneva, are working on solving these mysteries.

In May 2012, researchers there discovered the so-called Higgs Boson, whose prediction won Peter Higgs and François Englert the Nobel prize in physics.

One of the things CERN scientists are researching at the moment is dark matter: Although it may well have five times the mass of visible matter in the universe, this extent can only be indirectly proved. With a bit of luck, CERN will also succeed in generating dark matter.  Continue reading Infineon supplies CERN with sensors to detect dark matter

Driverless tech likely to trickle into consumer industry, says ASI Robots

asi robots

At the end of last year, ten of the world’s largest consumer vehicle manufacturers combined to announce that automated emergency braking systems would be a standard feature in all new vehicle models produced by the companies. The move is designed to reduce the number of rear end collisions which make up about a third of all accidents.

While each manufacturer’s system would work differently, the fundamental concept is the same: if forward facing sensors detect a slower moving or stopped vehicle ahead, the brakes automatically engage without driver intervention.

“We are entering an era of vehicle safety, focused on preventing crashes from ever occurring, rather than just protecting occupants when crashes happen,” said Anthony Foxx, US Transportation Secretary in the Los Angeles Times article. Continue reading Driverless tech likely to trickle into consumer industry, says ASI Robots

InVisage claims world’s first HD IoT camera sensor that can see invisible infrared light

invisage sparkp2
A picture of flowers, taken in infra-red light conditions

A company called InVisage is claiming it has launched the world’s first high-definition Internet of Things camera sensor which can detect near infra-red (NIR) light which is invisible to the human eye.

The innovation could have implications for autonomous vehicles being developed now, as well as a range of other technologies.

InVisage calls its new sensor Spark2, and says it is based on its previous range of camera sensors, which were given the name QuantumFilm.

The company says the SparkP2 is a 1.1 um pixel, 2-megapixel sensor in an ultra-compact 1/7 inch format for a lightweight footprint (less than 3 mm thin) that consumes over 20 times less power than conventional silicon near-infrared cameras. Continue reading InVisage claims world’s first HD IoT camera sensor that can see invisible infrared light

Sensors: ASI says advances bringing greater opportunities in autonomous vehicles

Raw point cloud data generated by ASI's Forcast lidar and analyzed by Vantage perception software
Raw point cloud data generated by ASI’s Forcast lidar and analyzed by Vantage perception software

Autonomous Solutions Inc (ASI) says advances in sensor technology is creating more opportunities in the autonomous vehicles sector, adding that the sensors are getting cheaper.

Each autonomous vehicle system employs a set of sensors that provide environmental feedback for safety, navigation, and other essential vehicle functions.

Up until this point, sensors with high levels of accuracy have been too expensive for most users to afford, but that is rapidly changing. Continue reading Sensors: ASI says advances bringing greater opportunities in autonomous vehicles