iRobot denies it will sell map data about customers’ rooms and houses

iRobot says it will “never” sell the data its little robotic vacuum cleaners collect while mapping and navigating people’s rooms and homes. 

In a statement provided to ZDNet, Colin Angle, CEO of iRobot, reassured customers by saying: “iRobot will never sell your data.”

The statement follows comments Angle gave to Reuters suggesting that the company might consider selling maps iRobot’s Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner generates of users’ homes.  Continue reading iRobot denies it will sell map data about customers’ rooms and houses

South Korea’s largest airport has hired robots made by LG to assist travellers

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The LG Airport Guide Robot

South Korea’s largest airport – Incheon International Airport, in Seoul – has given jobs to a number of robots made by LG Electronics. 

The mobile machines are designed to enable travellers to scan their tickets to get flight information and they can escort them to the flight gates.

Alternatively it can just provide directions to locations within the airport, complete with walking distances and times, or information about the traveller’s eventual destination, such as weather and other details.  Continue reading South Korea’s largest airport has hired robots made by LG to assist travellers

Carnegie Mellon names one of its rooms after Leybold

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University marks inauguration of a Leybold Conference and Reception Room at Carnegie Mellon University Nanofabrication Facility

Being at the forefront of university research is very important for innovating next generation vacuum technology products.

As a local partner with Pittsburgh based Carnegie Mellon University, Leybold has been not only a supplier, but also a generous and benevolent sponsor for years.

As an acknowledgement for this close cooperation, the CMU community named one of the new conference center and reception rooms “Leybold” and celebrated this inauguration with a presentation and reception held at the CMU Nanofabrication Facility recently.  Continue reading Carnegie Mellon names one of its rooms after Leybold

Physicists say they’ve manipulated ‘pure nothingness’ and observed the fallout

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An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by Professor Alfred Leitenstorfer has now shown how to manipulate the electric vacuum field and thus generate deviations from the ground state of empty space which can only be understood in the context of the quantum theory of light.

With these results, the researchers from the field of ultrafast phenomena and photonics build on their earlier findings, published in October 2015 in the scientific journal Science, where they have demonstrated direct detection of signals from pure nothingness.

This essential scientific progress might make it possible to solve problems that physicists have grappled with for a long time, ranging from a deeper understanding of the quantum nature of radiation to research on attractive material properties such as high-temperature superconductivity. Continue reading Physicists say they’ve manipulated ‘pure nothingness’ and observed the fallout

Cleaning robots: Everybot ready for messy jobs

There’s quite a few robotic floor cleaning devices already on the market, but there’s plenty of room for more. 

While the companies currently supplying robotic mops and vacuum cleaners have made a lot of money with them, the market is far from crowded.

The main reason for this is the price of robotic cleaning machines have actually been very high, especially if you go for the iRobot or Dyson models.  Continue reading Cleaning robots: Everybot ready for messy jobs

Vacuum cleaning robots invading homes all over the world

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Long-exposure photo showing path taken by Roomba in 45 minutes. Picture: Wikipedia

Other than washing the dishes, vacuuming the house is probably the most boring activity in the world, and probably only a very few sane humans would enjoy the activity. 

But household chores need to be done, and it is this human right to avoid boring tasks which the robots are exploiting to find their way into homes all over the world.

In the future, when we look back at how the robots took over everything, it’s probably not industrial robots which will be blamed – because they’re mostly caged off and controlled inside factories: it’s the vacuuming and other cleaning robots we should be scared of.

They might look innocent – with their rounded edges and small, apparently unintimidating size, maybe even reminiscent of a slow-moving pet cat, only better behaved – but vacuuming robots could be seen as the artificially intelligent machine army’s frontline infantry in the battle for the future of humanity, and they are gaining more and more floorspace every day.  Continue reading Vacuum cleaning robots invading homes all over the world