Brains trust: The impact of robotics on neurosurgery

Renishaw’s Neuroinspire surgical planning software
A screenshot from the newest version of Renishaw’s Neuroinspire surgical planning software

In this exclusive article, Stuart Campbell, clinical sales development manager of the neurological products division at Renishaw, discusses key trends on the use of robotics in neurosurgery

The curious case of Phineas Gage is one of the earliest and most well known cases of serious brain injury. On September 13th, 1848, Gage was working as a railway foreman in Vermont when an explosion caused a three foot long iron rod to be propelled straight through his skull.

At the time, doctors thought it impossible to survive such an injury and his remarkable survival and reported personality changes affected the study of neuroscience forever. In recent years, a new technology is changing the face of neuroscience – robotics, which offers high precision access to a complex and sensitive region.

Industrial environments are rife with automation and robotic systems. The upwards trend is only increasing, with the International Federation of Robotics predicting that by 2018, 1.3 million industrial robots will be entering service in factories across the globe.  Continue reading Brains trust: The impact of robotics on neurosurgery

Cambridge Consultants demonstrates tiny robot small enough to assist in eye operations

Cambridge Consultants has been demonstrating a tiny robot which is small enough to assist in eye surgery.

The company says the “Axsis” robot heralds “the next wave of surgical robotics innovation.

Propelling surgical innovation to the next stage, product design and development firm Cambridge Consultants is showcasing Axsis – one of the smallest known robots for surgical use. With an external body the size of a drinks can and instruments only 1.8 millimetres in diameter, Axsis provides a glimpse into the future of surgical robotics.  Continue reading Cambridge Consultants demonstrates tiny robot small enough to assist in eye operations

Your next nurse could be a robot, say scientists who trained one

 

operating room

Robots can successfully imitate human motions in the operating room, claim scientists

The nursing assistant for your next trip to the hospital might be a robot. This is the implication of research recently published by Dr Elena De Momi and colleagues in the open access journal Frontiers in Robotics and Artificial Intelligence.

Dr De Momi, of the Politecnico di Milano, in Italy, led an international team that trained a robot to imitate natural human actions. De Momi’s work indicates that humans and robots can effectively coordinate their actions during high-stakes events such as surgeries.

Over time this should lead to improvements in safety during surgeries because unlike their human counterparts robots do not tire and can complete an endless series of precise movements. The goal is not to remove human expertise from the operating room, but to complement it with a robot’s particular skills and benefits.  Continue reading Your next nurse could be a robot, say scientists who trained one

Orthopedic surgical robots to carry out joint replacement with precision

robotic surgery

Various advanced tools and techniques have been implemented by orthopedic surgeons over the past decade to improve patient outcomes.

These tools and techniques help them in improving patient outcomes and offer comfort to patients during treatment. The orthopedic surgery robots use the 3D imaging technology and computer navigation techniques to improve ability of surgeons to place implants with precise alignment.

Many studies have shown that these techniques are safer and more effective as compared to traditional surgical techniques. Continue reading Orthopedic surgical robots to carry out joint replacement with precision

The size of things to come: An exciting time for medical robotics

medical robotics human-eye-diagram

In this exclusive article for Robotics and Automation News, Chris Wagnerhead of advanced surgical systems at Cambridge Consultants, takes a microscopic look at the developments in medical robotics

This is an exciting time for medical robotics, as there is a proliferation of systems on the market or in development.

Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci, the long-time market leader for robotic laparoscopic procedures, now has potential competition from Medtronic, Verb Surgical (backed by Google and J&J), Auris Surgical, Transenterix’s ALF-X, and Titan Medical’s Sport system.

Similarly, the orthopaedics robot market is active with Stryker’s Mako platform, Think Surgical’s TCAT system, Mazor Robotics Renaissance system for spine surgery, and Blue Belt Technologies (now owned by Smith & Nephew) Navio system.

One interesting observation is of the physical size of the various systems as compared to the active operating volume of the robot.  Continue reading The size of things to come: An exciting time for medical robotics

FDA approves Auris robotic endoscopy system

auris robotic medical device
Artist’s illustration from Auris’ patent application

Though Auris has not unveiled its much awaited endoscopy system, the recent approval from the Food and Drug Association has got many industry experts and principal investigator sharing their opinion

How many of us would actually trust a robotic surgeon operating on us? Not many. But the new precise and dexterous medical robot approved by the FDA shows they could soon take over the operation theater.

Within the next 10 years, scientists believe computer-assisted surgery will be a popular and a standard feature in many operation rooms and critical extension of modern medical professionals, say research analysts at Allied Market Research.

Researchers analysing the growth, demand, size, and share of the Medical Robotics and Computer-Assisted Surgery Market say that areas such as Silicon Valley rank among the most active regions in the United States for medical robotics and Auris Surgical Robotics has managed to gain much recognition.  Continue reading FDA approves Auris robotic endoscopy system

Hong Kong University claims world’s first internally motorized minimally invasive surgical robotic system

Prof Law (left), Prof Yeung (middle) and Prof Yung (right), with their single incision or natural orifice (incision-less) robotic surgery system
Prof Law (left), Prof Yeung (middle) and Prof Yung (right), with their single incision or natural orifice (incision-less) robotic surgery system

A team in Hong Kong is claiming to have developed the world’s first internally motorized minimally invasive surgical robotic system for single incision or natural orifice (incision-less) robotic surgery. 

A statement by the the group, which comprises leading Hong Kong universities working with commercial partner companies, said the system can minimize surgical trauma and improve the safety of current robotic surgery.

The project is said to have developed a novel surgical robotic system (NSRS) with haptic (tactile) feedback and capable of single incision or natural orifice (incision-less) robotic surgery.

The development was initiated by Professor Yeung Chung-Kwong (Prof Yeung), honorary clinical professor at the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (HKU).  Continue reading Hong Kong University claims world’s first internally motorized minimally invasive surgical robotic system

Intuitive Surgical receives all-clear from US government on robotic surgery system

da vinci SingleSite-cross-section-hub-tissue-72dpi-200x127px

Intuitive Surgical, a maker of robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery, says the United States Food and Drug Administration has provided clearance for the company’s da Vinci Xi  Single-Site instruments and accessories.

Intuitive Surgical’s Single-Site technology enables surgeons to operate through a single incision in the patient’s umbilicus during cholecystectomy, benign hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy procedures.

“The da Vinci Xi was designed to seamlessly integrate advanced and future technologies and we are extremely pleased to further expand our line of product offerings with the clearance of Single-Site instruments and accessories,” said Sal Brogna, executive vice president, product operations, Intuitive Surgical. “Single-Site technology adds great versatility to the da Vinci Xi by enabling both single port and multi-port surgery on a single system.”  Continue reading Intuitive Surgical receives all-clear from US government on robotic surgery system