Samsung acquires permission to test autonomous vehicles in the US

Electronics giant Samsung has acquired a permit to test autonomous vehicles in California, according to a report by Reuters

The company is spending $8 billion acquiring Harman, which makes in-car entertainment technology and other car components.

Harman is what is called a Tier 1 supplier to the automotive trade, which means that they are one of a relatively small group of companies which supply parts or systems directly to car manufacturers.  Continue reading Samsung acquires permission to test autonomous vehicles in the US

Bosch launches ‘smallest, high performance’ barometric pressure sensor

Bosch BMP380 sensor
The Bosch BMP380 sensor measures 2 by 2 by 0.75 mm

Bosch Sensortec has launched what it says is the company’s smallest and best performing barometric pressure sensor, with a compact size of 2.0 x 2.0 x 0.75 mm.

The BMP380 sensor is aimed at the growing markets of gaming, sports and health management, as well as indoor and outdoor navigation.

By measuring barometric pressure, the sensor enables drones, smartphones, tablets, wearables and other mobile devices to accurately determine altitude changes, in both indoor and outdoor environments.  Continue reading Bosch launches ‘smallest, high performance’ barometric pressure sensor

The warehouse is becoming smarter

cemat logistics

CeMAT Update: Apps are conquering the world of intralogistics: smartphones and tablets are moving their way into storage and picking areas, supporting a wide range of processes

Our world is becoming increasingly intelligent, networked an mobile – and this development also extends to the storage and picking areas of commercial, industrial and service companies.

Smartphones and tablets are moving their way into the world of intralogistics, supporting a wide range of processes.  Continue reading The warehouse is becoming smarter

Reinventing the shopping trolley wheel

shopping trolleys

Sony used to be regarded as one of the very best technology companies in the world, but in the past few years the electronics giant has claimed that it’s had to deal with a few setbacks. Its mobile phone business is not as successful as it would like it to be, and the market it was hoping would lift its fortunes – sensors – is also said to be going through a less profitable phase.

It’s difficult to know what mind games these large, multinational corporations like Sony are playing, because even as it gives the impression of having to deal with struggles and challenges, its profits from smartphones are up 133 per cent, according to a report CNBC.com. Up 133 per cent? There’s probably plenty of companies who’d welcome having to struggle with 133 per cent increases in profits. Unless Sony staff are having to take all the money in rather large and heavy coins, one wonders what the struggle is.

However, Sony’s sensor business is reportedly not doing as well, with lower sales and fewer orders. Sony had previously said it would concentrate more on the sensor market, suggesting that it believed the technology was its way out of the current “struggle”.  Continue reading Reinventing the shopping trolley wheel