Airbus chooses Stratasys system to 3D print components for new aircraft

Stratasys has been chosen by Airbus to supply 3D printing and additive manufacturing systems for the production of components for aerospace company’s new plane. 

Airbus has already used the Stratasys FDM 3D Production System to produce 1,000 flight parts for use on its A350 XWB aircraft.

The 3D printed parts use a resin called Ultem 9085, which is certified to an Airbus material specifications to have a high strength to weight ratio and to be resistant to flame, smoke and toxicity – necessary for aircraft interiors.  Continue reading Airbus chooses Stratasys system to 3D print components for new aircraft

BMW and General Electric invest in Xometry manufacturing marketplace

 

bmw i cars 2

An online marketplace which offers custom-manufactured parts using 3D printing and machine learning to generate instant price quotes has raised $15 million in its latest funding round. 

Relatively new startup company Xometry – which rhymes with geometry and is pronounced zometry – has raised a total of $38 million since it was established in 2013.

The company already generates approximately $20 million in annual revenue and has hundreds of providers and more than 5,000 customers.  Continue reading BMW and General Electric invest in Xometry manufacturing marketplace

Why automated parts inspection is important in manufacturing

precision ball actuators

Inspection in manufacturing is a process that involves the testing, gauging, measuring, and examination of a material or specimen, with the express purpose of determining whether or not it is in proper condition.

Typically, specified standards are set, against which the results of the inspection are compared to establish if the material being inspected is able to pass this stage of quality control.

In the past, inspection used to be performed solely by human agents, a special workforce that was commonly equipped with the necessary paraphernalia, and sometimes, simply by their bare senses.  Continue reading Why automated parts inspection is important in manufacturing

Oticon uses Universal Robots machine to manipulate tiny little components inside hearing aid

oticon hearing aid

New robot lends precision and reliability to the production of hearing aids, says Oticon

Hearing aid device manufacturer Oticon required a more flexible robot to handle the tiny hearing device components in its production.

The company had been using robot technology for the past 10 years. But, as the minute components became increasingly smaller in order to make the hearing aids more comfortable, the existing two- and three-axis robots used in manufacturing were no longer suitable.

They could not perform the required lateral and vertical movements sufficiently. If for instance a small part is stuck in a mould, the robot should be dexterous enough to tip it out.  Continue reading Oticon uses Universal Robots machine to manipulate tiny little components inside hearing aid

Proactive vs reactive obsolescence management

Proactive vs reactive obsolescence management

Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director of obsolete parts supplier EU Automation discusses the benefits of a proactive obsolescence management strategy for manufactures

With industrial obsolescence speeding up, it is vital for manufacturers to have some level of obsolescence management strategy in place to mitigate the risks of obsolescence.

Companies can implement strategies that are proactive, reactive or a mixture.

According to one of Aesop’s fables, one summer’s day an ant was working hard dragging food back to its nest when came across an idle grasshopper, singing to its heart’s content.

The grasshopper asked the ant to stop and chat – but the ant ignored him and carried on preparing for winter.

When the seasons changed, the grasshopper looked enviously upon the ant’s vast food supplies and regretted his idleness bitterly.  Continue reading Proactive vs reactive obsolescence management

Renishaw 3D printing technology increases Land Rover BAR’s performance

land rover bar

Like many other cutting edge technologies – artificial intelligence, big data analytics – additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, has been incorporated into daily use at Land Rover Ben Ainslie Racing with the help of the team’s Technical Innovation Group.

In this case, TIG partner Renishaw, a global metrology firm which manufactures metal additive manufacturing machines, as well as working with the more familiar 3D printing in plastics for its own prototyping.

TIG project manager, George Sykes of PA Consulting, says: “We use 3D printing at three different levels within the team. The simplest level is as a prototyping and visualisation tool. We manufacture a large number of custom parts and 3D printing allows us to make full size prototypes in-house before we commit to a design.”  Continue reading Renishaw 3D printing technology increases Land Rover BAR’s performance

Renishaw and Dassault team up for integrated additive manufacturing

Dassault Systèmes catia

Engineering services provider Renishaw is collaborating with Dassault Systèmes, a 3D modelling, simulation and industrial operations software provider, as part of its commitment to provide and enhance software for metal additive manufacturing.

Users of Dassault Systèmes 3DExperience platform applications can now design, optimise, simulate and set up additive manufacturing builds directly for production on Renishaw’s additive manufacturing systems, which build 3D metal parts using laser powder bed fusion technology.  Continue reading Renishaw and Dassault team up for integrated additive manufacturing

Infographic: Why choose obsolete?

eu automation - industrial robots

Global supplier of industrial automation parts, EU Automation, has released an infographic detailing the benefits of purchasing obsolete components as opposed to buying brand new equipment.

Focusing on the financial and regulatory benefits of sourcing obsolete, the handy infographic is available to download from the EU Automation website.

By investigating the cost of downtime in manufacturing industries, specifically for the food and beverage, automotive and pharmaceutical sectors, EU Automation’s infographic names sourcing obsolete components as one of the fastest and most cost-effective ways to minimise stoppages in production.  Continue reading Infographic: Why choose obsolete?

Will collaborative consumption change manufacturing?

Collaborative economy in manufacturing 600

Robert Holloway, head of order fulfilment at obsolete industrial automation parts supplier EU Automation explores the effects of collaborative consumption on the manufacturing industry

Everyone has at least one old piece of clothing that they can’t bear to throw away. Believe it or not, the situation is similar with spare industrial parts. Manufacturers often keep a huge amount of spares, despite rarely accessing these stocks.

Collaborative consumption is the seamless circulation of products and services among individuals through sharing, swapping, trading, renting, borrowing or giving.

Collaborative consumption, also called the sharing economy, is likely to grow over the next few years as digital media increase in reach and functionality.  Continue reading Will collaborative consumption change manufacturing?

Boeing completes prototype parts for 777X wing at new billion-dollar advanced manufacturing facility

boeing 777x

Boeing says it has completed prototype parts for the wing of its new 777X Dreamliner aircraft

The company is using advanced manufacturing methods, including additive or 3D printing, in the construction of the passenger plane at its new $1 billion Everett, Washington facility.

When completed, the wing for the 777X will be the largest wing Boeing has ever built.  Continue reading Boeing completes prototype parts for 777X wing at new billion-dollar advanced manufacturing facility

US manufacturing growing at ‘fastest rate in two years’

robots

The US manufacturing sector is growing at the fastest rate it has in more than two years, according to calculations produced by the Institute for Supply Management and published in Forbes, among other media. 

The Manufacturing ISM Report on Business figures show December was the best month for manufacturers in 2016. More components and parts were ordered this month than previous ones.

The ISM report is a survey sent out to a “manufacturing committee”, and collating the responses revealed that “of the 18 manufacturing industries, 11 are reporting growth in December”, according to ISM.

The ISM adds: “Economic activity in the manufacturing sector expanded in December, and the overall economy grew for the 91st consecutive month.”

More details at ISM’s website

Genuine Parts buys Braas

genuine parts

Genuine Parts says its subsidiary, Motion Industries, has acquired Braas.

Braas is a multi-regional distributor of products and services for industrial automation and control, specializing in pneumatics, motion control, industrial networking, machine safety, robotics and related industrial parts.

Founded in 1961, Braas is based in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, and serves thousands of customers throughout the Midwest and Southeastern United States from a network of five sales offices and three warehouses.  Continue reading Genuine Parts buys Braas

Five common myths about reconditioned components 

Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director of industrial automation supplier EU Automation, dispels common misconceptions about purchasing reconditioned industrial parts

Dismiss almost every Viking costume you’ve ever laid eyes on. While these threatening Scandinavian tribes did wear all sorts of bizarre headgear when marching into battle, there’s no reason to believe it was decked with the intimidating horns popular culture loves so much.

There are countless myths and fallacies which over time, have become commonly accepted as the truth. Misconceptions about reconditioned industrial automation parts are no exception.  Continue reading Five common myths about reconditioned components 

RS Components launches new solutions for industrial motion control

rs components

RS Components has launched a range of products and solutions for companies involved in motion control applications equip and maintain systems, such as conveyors, used in diverse industries including automotive, packaging, manufacturing and production or in the chemical or food and beverage processing sectors.

Heiko Luckhaupt, marketing manager at RS, says the new line of components will enable companies to “keep current systems up and running for as long as possible”.

RS says budgetary constraint is an increasingly significant factor and many companies do not always have the luxury of purchasing completely new motion control systems.

RS says companies are more often than not faced with the challenge of keeping ageing conveyor systems operational and have key decisions to make about maintenance and partial system upgrades.  Continue reading RS Components launches new solutions for industrial motion control

Clearpath to provide GE Healthcare repair center with self-driving vehicles

The Clearpath Otto logistics robot
The Clearpath Otto logistics robot

A fleet of Otto self-driving vehicles will automate just-in-time parts delivery within Milwaukee facility 

Clearpath, the developer of Otto – a self-driving vehicle designed for material transport, has been selected to automate just-in-time parts delivery in a GE Healthcare repair facility being expanded near Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

“The Otto fleet will optimize GE Healthcare’s just-in-time manufacturing process to help enable repair cells to operate at full capacity,” said Matt Rendall, chief executive officer at Clearpath Robotics.  Continue reading Clearpath to provide GE Healthcare repair center with self-driving vehicles