Atos launches quantum computer emulator and associated programming language

bretton atos portrait small
Thierry Breton, CEO of Atos, alongside the company’s new Quantum Learning Machine, a quantum computer simulator built using Intel chips.

By Abdul Montaqim

A company called Atos has built and released what it claims is the world’s first commercially available quantum computer emulator.

In terms of hardware, it uses Intel chips and what might be considered classical computing technology.

But it’s programmed to simulate a quantum computer. Atos has named it the Quantum Learning Machine, and has even invented a new language for programming it.  Continue reading Atos launches quantum computer emulator and associated programming language

Book: Cognitive Approach to Natural Language Processing

Book title: Cognitive Approach to Natural Language Processing
Authors: Bernadette Sharp, Florence Sedes and Wieslaw Lubaszewski

As natural language processing spans many different disciplines, it is sometimes difficult to understand the contributions and the challenges that each of them presents.

This book explores the special relationship between natural language processing and cognitive science, and the contribution of computer science to these two fields.

It is based on the recent research papers submitted at the international workshops of Natural Language and Cognitive Science which was launched in 2004 in an effort to bring together natural language researchers, computer scientists, and cognitive and linguistic scientists to collaborate together and advance research in natural language processing.

The chapters cover areas related to language understanding, language generation, word association, word sense disambiguation, word predictability, text production and authorship attribution.

This book will be relevant to students and researchers interested in the interdisciplinary nature of language processing.

AI crossword-solving application could make machines better at understanding language

crossword
Image credit: Beth

A web-based machine language system solves crossword puzzles far better than commercially-available products, and may help machines better understand language.

Researchers at Cambridge University have designed a web-based platform which uses artificial neural networks to answer standard crossword clues better than existing commercial products specifically designed for the task.

The system, which is freely available online, could help machines understand language more effectively.  Continue reading AI crossword-solving application could make machines better at understanding language