Investing in robotics: Will ‘makers’ make a difference in the established industry?

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In this part of our series of articles about investing in robotics and automation, Brian Gahsman, managing partner and chief investment officer at GBSfunds, gives his view of how new inventors can change the market and what his company, Gahsman Branton, is interested in investing in 

Check out realtime stock prices for companies in the robotics, automation and relating computing sectors

Robotics and Automation News: More “maker” and startup companies seem able to produce robotics and automation technology. How will this affect the market? 

Brian Gahsman: We are barely on the cusp of seeing the flood of startups that will enter this space. Now that the technology is at a point of cost effectiveness many who for decades were only hobbyists now have the ability to bring their creations to the market.

As that trend increases so will the rate of M&A activity which we are already seeing with companies like Kuka as well as the recent acquisition of SLM Solutions and Arcam by GE in attempt to corner the market in metal based additive 3D printing.  Continue reading Investing in robotics: Will ‘makers’ make a difference in the established industry?

Investing in robotics: Established companies or startups?

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Picture courtesy: Caixin Online

In this part of our series of articles about investing in robotics and automation, Brian Gahsman, managing partner and chief investment officer at GBSfunds, explains what type of robotics and automation enterprises his company, Gahsman Branton, is interested in investing in 


Check out realtime stock prices for companies in the robotics, automation and relating computing sectors


Robotics and Automation News: Are you mainly looking at investing in established companies or startups?

Brian Gahsman: Actually both. There is a great number of publicly traded companies in this space with established earnings and the leaders make a solid foundation of the holdings in my strategy. That being said, even these established companies began as startups in the not so distant past.

I believe that robotics and automation in itself is currently in its infancy stage so maintaining a solid blend of micro-cap, small cap, mid-cap and large cap stocks is the only way to assure my strategy as a whole rides the same wave as the technological evolution that it is based on.  Continue reading Investing in robotics: Established companies or startups?

Investing in robotics and automation: Why bother?

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In the second of our new series of articles about investing in robotics and automation, Brian Gahsman, managing partner and chief investment officer at GBSfunds, explains why his company, Gahsman Branton, is interested in investing in the robotics and automation market 


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Source: Gahsman Branton 

Check out realtime stock prices for companies in the robotics, automation and relating computing sectors


Robotics and Automation News: What is it about investing in the robotics and automation sector you find attractive?

Brian Gahsman: Years ago, one of my main focuses of investment was biotechnology and life sciences. During this time my research led me a couple of companies:

  1. Intuitive Surgical, which created the da Vinci robotic surgical system; and
  2. Organovo (main picture), whose technology is in the field of creating human organs from their proprietary biological 3D printing system.

I was fascinated by these companies’ seemingly game-changing technologies. I began exploring other companies worldwide involved in robotics and automation and found that these companies spanning multiple industries and sectors have emerged to become an entire industry group in itself and potentially an outperforming investment theme.  Continue reading Investing in robotics and automation: Why bother?

Investment in manufacturing robotics could boost British economy by £60bn within a decade, says Barclays

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Investing an additional £1.2bn into manufacturing processes, to increase robotics and automation over the next decade, could add as much as £60.5bn to the UK economy over the next decade, forecasts new research from Barclays. This is equivalent to nearly two fifths of the manufacturing sector’s value to the economy today.

The “Future-proofing UK manufacturing” report reveals that investing in automation technology will help to increase the international competitiveness of the UK’s manufacturing sector through increased manufacturing productivity and efficiency. As a result of additional investment, the manufacturing sector will be worth £191bn in 2025, £8.6bn more than currently projected and a 19.6% increase on today.

Furthermore, increased investment in automation will help to soften the expected long-term decline in manufacturing sector jobs by safeguarding 73,500 additional workers in 2025, due to the creation of a larger, more productive and competitive UK manufacturing sector. Continue reading Investment in manufacturing robotics could boost British economy by £60bn within a decade, says Barclays