General Motors reveals autonomous electric mobile platform

 

General Motors has unveiled a new type of vehicle which the company says is flexible, autonomous and is powered by fuel cell technology – or electric. 

GM says the Silent Utility Rover Universal Superstructure – Surus, for short – delivers highly mobile autonomous capability and agility in unpredictable terrain.

This would make it suitable for military use, which is what GM is aiming at. But it could also find applications in the commercial logistics industry, another market GM has listed where Surus could find work. Continue reading General Motors reveals autonomous electric mobile platform

GM acquires lidar developer Strobe to accelerate driverless car development

 

General Motors has acquired lidar – light detection and radar – technology company Strobe.

As part of the deal, Strobe’s engineering talent will join GM’s Cruise Automation team to develop next-generation lidar solutions for self-driving vehicles.

Kyle Vogt, founder and CEO, Cruise Automation, says: “Strobe’s LIDAR technology will significantly improve the cost and capabilities of our vehicles so that we can more quickly accomplish our mission to deploy driverless vehicles at scale.” Continue reading GM acquires lidar developer Strobe to accelerate driverless car development

Electric car industry sparks into life

2017-chevrolet-volt-electric-car

Two of the world’s biggest automakers have made moves which would suggest electric cars will become mass-market vehicles much sooner than perhaps some may have expected. 

General Motors has decided to bring forward its production of the all-electric Chevy Volt, according to a report in Manufacturers’ Monthly, which quotes a report on Associated Press.

The vehicles will go on sale towards the end of this year for around $30,000.  Continue reading Electric car industry sparks into life

Industrial robots can now do their work uninterrupted thanks to the cloud and offline programming

fanuc industrial robot

Industrial robots are increasingly being connected to the cloud, where they can be managed centrally in some sort of control room, which means that a small number of human staff could theoretically manage hundreds, if not thousands, of machines.

Previously they were almost always operated in isolated circumstances within factories, inside a work cell, fenced off from human workers because of safety concerns. They were programmed individually, using a teach pendant, which is like a 20-years-out-of-date oversized mobile phone.

The teach pendant is still used for refinements and modifications after the machine goes online, into work, but nowadays most industrial robots are prepared for a life of work using offline programming. Continue reading Industrial robots can now do their work uninterrupted thanks to the cloud and offline programming