Continental demonstrates ‘Cruising Chauffeur’, its vision of autonomous driving

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Continental’s Cruising Chauffeur autonomous vehicle

Continental has showcased its “Cruising Chauffeur”, an self-driving car platform which provides an insight into the company’s vision of the future of what it calls “highly automated driving” on highways.

Highly automated driving on highways is no longer just a dream, says the company, but now a reality.

Continental started testing systems for automated driving on public roads back in 2012 in Nevada, and was the first automotive supplier to receive the state’s license to test automated vehicles.  Continue reading Continental demonstrates ‘Cruising Chauffeur’, its vision of autonomous driving

ADAS: Features of advanced driver assistance systems

This is a long list of features of advanced driver assistance systems, or ADAS as it’s called in the automotive industry. 

ADAS is an umbrella term. Its individual technologies are basically small autonomous systems.

Taken together, ADAS is essentially a self-driving system, but it’s not promoted as such because of regulatory reasons.  Continue reading ADAS: Features of advanced driver assistance systems

SAE’s full list of levels for autonomous vehicles

This is the full list of SAE’s autonomy levels:

Level 0 – No Automation: The full-time performance by the human driver of all aspects of the dynamic driving task, even when enhanced by warning or intervention systems.

Level 1 – Driver Assistance: The driving mode-specific execution by a driver assistance system of either steering or acceleration/deceleration using information about the driving environment and with the expectation that the human driver performs all remaining aspects of the dynamic driving task.

Level 2 – Partial Automation: The driving mode-specific execution by one or more driver assistance systems of both steering and acceleration/deceleration using information about the driving environment and with the expectation that the human driver performs all remaining aspects of the dynamic driving task.

Level 3 – Conditional Automation: The driving mode-specific performance by an Automated Driving System of all aspects of the dynamic driving task with the expectation that the human driver will respond appropriately to a request to intervene.

Level 4 – High Automation: The driving mode-specific performance by an Automated Driving System of all aspects of the dynamic driving task, even if a human driver does not respond appropriately to a request to intervene.

Level 5 – Full Automation: The full-time performance by an Automated Driving System of all aspects of the dynamic driving task under all roadway and environmental conditions that can be managed by a human driver.

Bosch and Mercedes partner on driverless car technology

daimler driverless cars
Daimler’s vision: Future mobility will mean that within a specified area of town, users will be able to use their smartphone to order a car sharing car or robot taxi. The vehicle will then make its way autonomously to the user and the onward journey can commence.

Two of the largest car technology companies in the world have formed a partnership which is very likely to accelerate the development of autonomous vehicles. 

Bosch and Daimler – parent company of Mercedes – claim they can launch fully driverless, or “Level 5”, cars as early as 2020.

Global engineering organisation SAE International’s levels 2-5 range from partial to full automation. The full list of can be viewed here.

Rianne Ojeh, a spokesperson for Bosch, told Independent.co.uk: “The aim is to launch a production-ready and reliable driving system for fully-automated and driverless driving. For two years the systems will be used exclusively in Mercedes-Benz vehicles. After that the products can be supplied to third parties.”  Continue reading Bosch and Mercedes partner on driverless car technology

Nvidia developing self-driving technology with truckmaker Paccar

Nvidia is working with Paccar, a truck manufacturer, on developing solutions for autonomous vehicles. 

The collaboration was shared by Nvidia founder and CEO Jen-Hsun Huang during his keynote at the Bosch Connected World conference in Berlin.

Separately, he provided details of Nvidia’s partnership with Bosch, the world’s largest automotive supplier, on self-driving car technology.

“This is probably the largest single mass of a product that we’ve helped make,” said Huang, addressing a crowd of more than 2,000 executives, developers and others attending the event.  Continue reading Nvidia developing self-driving technology with truckmaker Paccar

Nvidia and Bosch launch artificially intelligent self-driving car computer

Nvidia CEO Huang on stage at Bosch event
Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang on stage at Bosch event

One of the world’s largest automotive suppliers, Bosch, provided a massive stage today for Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang to showcase its new artificial intelligence platform for self-driving cars.

Speaking in the heart of Berlin to several thousand attendees at Bosch Connected World — an annual conference dedicated to the Internet of Things — Huang detailed how deep learning is fueling an AI revolution in the auto industry.

The small AI car supercomputer was unveiled last week in the opening keynote address by Bosch CEO Dr Volkmar Denner, who focused on how his company, which had €73 billion in revenue last year, is pushing deeper into the areas of sensors, software and services.  Continue reading Nvidia and Bosch launch artificially intelligent self-driving car computer

Connected and autonomous cars: Driving in the cloud

Driving in the cloud

Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director of obsolete components supplier, EU Automation explains how cloud computing can help both manufacturers and owners make the most of their vehicle

Today, we consider wireless connectivity and parking assist to be standard features in new models of car.

However, roll back 50 years and it was a different story; there was much less technology of any kind in most vehicles.

The three-point seatbelt didn’t become standard until 1970 and airbags weren’t mandatory until 1998. With cloud computing on the rise, we’re seeing more high-tech features being added to vehicles than ever.

Cloud computing plays a pivotal role in helping original equipment manufacturers manage and control the data and connectivity needed to run a system of remote downloads and upgrades across all the cars they sell.  Continue reading Connected and autonomous cars: Driving in the cloud

A different way to think about autonomous technology

By Megan Nichols, editor of SchooledByScience.com

Autonomous cars are the wave of the future, with more models released every year. These cars typically feature either a full auto pilot or driver assistance systems designed to make the ride safer and smoother.

Most of the technology we think of as autonomous or self-driving is already implemented in new cars as advanced driver assistance systems. These systems, like cruise control, lane sensing, blind spot alerts and more are all pieces of the self-driving car puzzle, found in most new car models.

For example, the basic concept of cruise control is not a new one. Ralph Teetor filed the first patent for a cruise control device in 1948, and it was installed on its first model just 10 years later. Today, adaptive cruise control (ACC) systems installed in newer cars take the basic idea introduced more than half a century ago and add features like automatic speed adjustment based on the location of other cars on the road.  Continue reading A different way to think about autonomous technology

Continental expands advanced driver assistance systems business in Asia

Continental is expanding its advanced driver assistance systems business in Asia and expects sales to reach $2.2 billion a year by 2020.

The company says it is on course to achieve €1 billion in sales this year, and is aiming to capitalise on this growth by developing its Asian operations.

Continental says it will increase production capacity for radar sensors in the Philippines and China, and accelerate its knowledge transfer and staff expansion.

Continental is estimated to be the market leader in advanced driver assistance systems, which is in essence autonomous car technology.

Continue reading Continental expands advanced driver assistance systems business in Asia

Advanced driver assistance systems trump driverless cars by stealth

While everyone seems fascinated by driverless cars brought to us via Silicon Valley, established suppliers of advanced driver assistance systems are quietly doing a roaring trade 

The automotive industry is going through some fundamental changes, mostly because of computer technology. 

The changes include higher levels of computer processing, fully driverless vehicles, greater levels of autonomy, internet connectivity, and the switch from petrol-powered combustion engines to electric.

It’s probably inevitable that the combustion engine will be gone from most mass-manufactured cars within a couple of decades, and will eventually only be seen in antique cars and supercars, although even some supercars are going electric.

Which means the road-going vehicle of the near-future will essentially be computers with wheels, connected to the cloud, and largely autonomous – or, in other words, a robot. In fact, this is what is already happening because of advanced driver assistance systems, or ADAS.  Continue reading Advanced driver assistance systems trump driverless cars by stealth

The role of humans in the testing of autonomous cars

autonomous car simulation

Ansible Motion develops driving simulators for autonomous car engineering, but with one important additional component — the human driver 

The interest in, and momentum assigned to, the introduction of autonomous cars may appear substantial to anyone catching articles in the media.

We can certainly find plenty of aspirational images of happy people reading books or watching films whilst travelling down the motorway.  Excellent.  But our lovely ‘digital living space’ will require substantial validation before we get down that road.

With hundreds of (computer) processors and sensors required to offer even simple driver assistance systems, signing off a fully autonomous car with any level of confidence is not going to be an easy assignment for vehicle manufacturers. And that sign off is going to need some human involvement. Continue reading The role of humans in the testing of autonomous cars

Nissan using alien technology from Mars inside autonomous car system

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Alien technology scientist Maarten Sierhuis developed the ProPilot autonomous car system for Nissan

From Nasa mission control to the driver’s seat: an interview with the alien technology developer shaping the future of autonomous driving for Nissan 

Space was not the final frontier for computer scientist Maarten Sierhuis.

The former Nasa scientist, who once designed human-robot interactions and developed collaborative intelligent systems for space exploration, now focuses his efforts a bit closer to home: the artificial intelligence that’s helping power the future of Nissan’s autonomous vehicles.

But the passion that carried the robotics and artificial intelligence expert to the apogee of the US space program hasn’t cooled with his move to an earthly job as director of the Nissan Research Center (NRC) in California’s Silicon Valley.  Continue reading Nissan using alien technology from Mars inside autonomous car system

‘One in every 15 cars uses our chips,’ boasts Infineon

System diagram of automotive 77 GHz radar system
System diagram of automotive 77 GHz radar system

Infineon Technologies predicts that by the end of 2016, more than half of all new automotive 77-GHz radar systems worldwide will be equipped with chips from the company. 

Statistically speaking, that means around one in 15 new cars will use a driver assistance system with 77-GHz radar chips from Infineon.

Given these figures, Infineon claims “market leadership… in the rapidly growing market for radar chips for driver assistance systems”. Continue reading ‘One in every 15 cars uses our chips,’ boasts Infineon

Audi integrates new autonomous technologies into A3 models

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The new Audi A3, which now has lots of autonomous tech

Audi has integrated a range of new autonomous technologies into its A3 model as part of a major upgrade. 

The company says it has added new driver assistance systems and engines as well as newly designed headlights and taillights.

Also new on board is what Audi says is an “innovative operating and display concept”, the Audi virtual cockpit.  Continue reading Audi integrates new autonomous technologies into A3 models

Infineon signs deal with TTTech to speed up development in autonomous driving

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Infineon has reached an agreement with TTTech on the joint development of autonomous vehicle technologies. 

Under the guidance of Audi, TTTech developed a central platform control unit, “zFAS”, integrating various functionalities of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

The ECU also enables comprehensive fusion of sensor data. Microcontrollers from Infineon Technologies safeguard that highest requirements towards computing performance and safety are met.  Continue reading Infineon signs deal with TTTech to speed up development in autonomous driving