Americans positive about future of manufacturing but wouldn’t want to work in it

manufacturing usa deloitte report

Americans are optimistic about the future of manufacturing despite saying they wouldn’t want to work in the sector. 

The US manufacturing industry suffers from an important image problem that undermines its competitiveness, says a new opinion survey by Deloitte and the National Association of Manufacturers.

Only 50 per cent of Americans think manufacturing jobs are interesting and less than 30 per cent are likely to encourage their children to pursue a career.  Continue reading Americans positive about future of manufacturing but wouldn’t want to work in it

Manufacturing industry critical to economic prosperity, say Americans

national assn manufacturing pic

The vast majority of Americans believe manufacturing plays a vital role in safeguarding US economic prosperity and maintaining their quality of life, according to the 2017 Manufacturing Perceptions Survey from Deloitte and The Manufacturing Institute.

The study found more than three-quarters (76 percent) of Americans surveyed believe the US should invest further in the manufacturing industry.

Jay Timmons, president and CEO of the National Association of Manufacturers, says: “Modern manufacturing has captured the imagination of the American public and our elected leaders.

“This important research indicates public opinion of the future of the industry has taken a measurable, positive jump as people acknowledge the strong connection between this industry, the US economy and the American way of life.

“As we have done with our Creators Wanted video series, manufacturers are taking it upon themselves to tell the story of our industry and the lives we touch. It’s encouraging to see that our story is resonating.”  Continue reading Manufacturing industry critical to economic prosperity, say Americans

‘Fifty per cent of S&P 500 firms could be replaced in 10 years’

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One of the world’s largest business consultancy firms says many of the largest companies we know today will probably be overtaken by new corporate giants within a decade. 

In a report into what’s being called the “fourth industrial revolution”, Deloitte says: “About 50 percent of S&P 500 firms will likely be replaced over the next 10 years due to new digital disruptors and inability of established firms to reinvent themselves.”

The consultancy adds: “How companies choose to evolve, explore new avenues for growth, and better engage their customers can make the difference between thriving and extinction.”  Continue reading ‘Fifty per cent of S&P 500 firms could be replaced in 10 years’

Huge reboot: What Trump’s aversion to trade blocs could mean for the US robotics, automation and manufacturing industries

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US President-elect Donald Trump reacts to a crowd gathered in the lobby of the New York Times building after a meeting in New York, US, November 22, 2016. Reuters/Lucas Jackson

The US automotive manufacturing industry is probably going through some angsty times right now, what with president-elect Donald Trump reiterating his campaign pledge to repeal or at least renegotiate the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and any other free-trade deal previous administrations have signed up to. 

For a highly globalised industry like the automotive sector, which sources parts from all over the world and may assemble its vehicles in any number of countries simultaneously based on a common platform, this is perhaps one election promise which it would rather not be kept.

However, Trump has already produced a presidential address style video in which he says: “I am going to issue a notification of intent to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a potential disaster for our country.

“Instead, we will negotiate fair, bilateral trade deals that bring jobs and industry back onto American shores.”  Continue reading Huge reboot: What Trump’s aversion to trade blocs could mean for the US robotics, automation and manufacturing industries

US will regain top spot from China in manufacturing by 2020, says report

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Outgoing US President Barack Obama giving some speech about manufacturing

lockThe United States will regain its lead as the world’s most competitive manufacturing nation by the year 2020, according to a report by economic analyst Deloitte. 

Deloitte made its forecast after surveying the opinions of manufacturing industry executives for its 2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index.

Deloitte says “executives expect the US to assume the top position before the end of the decade”.  Continue reading US will regain top spot from China in manufacturing by 2020, says report

Jobs for the robots: One in four human workers to be automated

kuka collaborative robot
Yeah, you can call it a collaborative robot for now, and work with it, but pretty soon it will put you out of your job

One quarter of business services jobs at risk of automation in the next 20 years, according to Deloitte business analysts

More than a quarter of jobs in the business services sector are at high risk of automation in the next 20 years, according to a report by Deloitte, the business advisory firm. This is largely a result of the falling cost of technology combined with the rising cost of labour.

Of the 3,300,000 jobs currently classed as business services, 800,000 (25 per cent) to 1 million (31 per cent) have a high chance of being automated.  Continue reading Jobs for the robots: One in four human workers to be automated