Industrial internet technical standards groups form alliance

Two of the leading industrial internet technical standards groups have formed an alliance which is likely to accelerate the development of technologies in the sector.

The Industrial Internet Consortium and the Edge Computing Consortium have signed a partnership agreement – technically a memorandum of understanding – to advance the industrial Internet and edge computing.

Under the agreement, the consortia say they will work together to “maximize interoperability and portability for the industrial Internet”.  Continue reading Industrial internet technical standards groups form alliance

Connecting the dots of quantum computing

ibm 4-qubit square circuit
Layout of IBM’s four superconducting quantum bit device announced in 2015. Using a square lattice, IBM is able to detect both types of quantum errors for the first time. (Credit: IBM Research)

By Sachin Garg, associate director, electronics and semiconductors practice, MarketsandMarkets Research

Binary computers helped us to get connected with an entirely new realm of opportunities and possibilities. It took a lot of effort and time to build a computer which can execute multiple tasks and handle massive calculations at the same time.

But despite many innovations and developments, the computing systems currently available are not fast enough in handling complex problems and calculations.

To address this problem, various tech companies and organisations have been developing computing systems which can use quantum concepts to execute complex tasks and solve any problems.  Continue reading Connecting the dots of quantum computing

Atos launches quantum computer emulator and associated programming language

bretton atos portrait small
Thierry Breton, CEO of Atos, alongside the company’s new Quantum Learning Machine, a quantum computer simulator built using Intel chips.

By Abdul Montaqim

A company called Atos has built and released what it claims is the world’s first commercially available quantum computer emulator.

In terms of hardware, it uses Intel chips and what might be considered classical computing technology.

But it’s programmed to simulate a quantum computer. Atos has named it the Quantum Learning Machine, and has even invented a new language for programming it.  Continue reading Atos launches quantum computer emulator and associated programming language

Volkswagen buys D-Wave quantum computers which sell for $15 million each

D-Wave’s quantum computing system

Volkswagen has become a customer of D-Wave Systems, which builds quantum computers that cost $15 million each. 

Martin Hofmann, VW’s chief information officer, told New York Times that the investment in quantum computing technology is a sign of things to come. “For us, it’s a new era of technology,” he said.

VW is claimed to have used a D-Wave computer to steer the movements of 10,000 taxis in Beijing simultaneously, optimising their routes and reducing congestion, according to the report in NYT.  Continue reading Volkswagen buys D-Wave quantum computers which sell for $15 million each

Nebbiolo Technologies launches ‘fog computing’ for industrial automation

nebbiola

Nebbiolo Technologies has launched its first product line, embracing fog computing – often referred to as edge computing – as a keystone for the Industrial IoT and Industry 4.0.

In this context, fog computing will provide a powerful new functionality layer in the industrial automation pyramid, enabling the convergence between information technologies and operational technologies. Continue reading Nebbiolo Technologies launches ‘fog computing’ for industrial automation

Nvidia launches new board for robotics development

NVIDIA-Jetson-TX2

Company says its IoT platform for manufacturing, industrial, retail will be made possible by Nvidia’s artificially intelligent-powered Jetson 

Nvidia has unveiled the Nvidia Jetson TX2, a credit card-sized platform that it says delivers AI computing at the edge – opening the door to “powerfully intelligent” factory robots, commercial drones and smart cameras for AI cities. 

Jetson TX2 offers twice the performance of its predecessor, or it can run at more than twice the power efficiency, while drawing less than 7.5 watts of power. This allows Jetson TX2 to run larger, deeper neural networks on edge devices.

The result: smarter devices with higher accuracy and faster response times for tasks like image classification, navigation and speech recognition. Continue reading Nvidia launches new board for robotics development

Connected and autonomous cars: Driving in the cloud

Driving in the cloud

Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director of obsolete components supplier, EU Automation explains how cloud computing can help both manufacturers and owners make the most of their vehicle

Today, we consider wireless connectivity and parking assist to be standard features in new models of car.

However, roll back 50 years and it was a different story; there was much less technology of any kind in most vehicles.

The three-point seatbelt didn’t become standard until 1970 and airbags weren’t mandatory until 1998. With cloud computing on the rise, we’re seeing more high-tech features being added to vehicles than ever.

Cloud computing plays a pivotal role in helping original equipment manufacturers manage and control the data and connectivity needed to run a system of remote downloads and upgrades across all the cars they sell.  Continue reading Connected and autonomous cars: Driving in the cloud

Beyond Moore’s Law: Human-plus-machine computing

d-wave processor

By Adam Devine, vice president of marketing, WorkFusion

How do we move forward in a world where Moore’s Law no longer holds true? For five decades, Gordon Moore’s famous prediction about processing power doubling about every two years held firm.

It was a reliable sort of constant as innovators continued to increase the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits.

But all good things must come to an end, and Moore’s Law has been confounded by another, more immutable law: physics.  Continue reading Beyond Moore’s Law: Human-plus-machine computing

Books: Artificial intelligence – a feast for the brain

Elsevier has released four new books on the subject of Artificial Intelligence. Below, the publisher provides an overview of each of the books  Continue reading Books: Artificial intelligence – a feast for the brain

Distec signs distribution deal with Wincomm on industrial computers

wincomm-industrial-computer

Industrial computing specialist Distec has agreed a deal to stock the Wincomm Range of 15″, 19″ and 21.5″ fully waterproof industrial PCs.

The Manchester, UK based company, which supplies touchscreens, PCs and computing accessories to sectors including the food and beverage industry, says it has chosen the Wincomm range for its high quality components, which make it suitable for even the toughest environments.

The Wincomm range is particularly designed for the food and beverage industry, abattoirs and chemical plants, where PCs can be exposed to dangerous or unhygienic solids or liquids. Wincomm industrial PCs are housed in stainless, high-strength, anti-corrosion housing, meaning they will not wear over time.  Continue reading Distec signs distribution deal with Wincomm on industrial computers

A new dawn of car tech: customization through software, not hardware

car

Three ways entrepreneurs can bring the rate of progress we’ve seen in computing and communication to car tech.

Throughout much of early-to-mid 20th century, cutting-edge design and technology found its way into cars. Following the invention of the integrated circuit, chips and bits started displacing pistons and gears in the hearts and minds of engineers.

Silicon Valley’s gravitational force began stripping Motor City of its talent, compounding with the success of every tech startup. Not long after the birth of the Internet, Silicon Valley experienced unencumbered prosperity, while Detroit struggled to hold on for dear life.

Full article: http://www.oreilly.com/pub/cpc/20765

The internet of zombies: How to prepare industry for the outbreak

zombies

Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director of obsolete components supplier, EU Automation, discusses the internet of zombies and advises on how companies can prepare for the outbreak

Since Dawn of the Dead was first released in 1978, the possibility of a viral outbreak that will turn us all into night crawling, flesh-eating zombies has become a worry for many and a very prolific Hollywood theme.

While it’s unlikely this will ever happen, industry has recently started facing an epidemic across IT systems that companies should be aware of. The internet of zombies won’t result in the end of civilisation, but it does put your company’s confidential information at risk.

The term internet of zombies, was coined by cyber security solutions provider, Radware in its Global Application and Network Security Report 2015-16. The concept refers to the rise of an advanced type of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack, named Advanced Persistent Denial of Service (APDoS). This type of attack uses short bursts of high volume attacks in random intervals, spanning a time frame of several weeks.  Continue reading The internet of zombies: How to prepare industry for the outbreak

The great migration: cloud computing for smart manufacturing

smart factory illustration

Martyn Williams, managing director at Copa-Data UK, discusses “unlocking the value of cross-facility data sets” through cloud computing for smart manufacturing

According to an industry survey by IBM, two thirds of mid-sized companies have already implemented – or are currently considering – a cloud based storage model for their organisation.

The analytic advantages of cloud computing in industry are no secret, in fact, 70 per cent of these cloud-using respondents said they were actively pursuing cloud-based analytics to gleam greater insights and efficiency in order to achieve business goals.  Continue reading The great migration: cloud computing for smart manufacturing

Human Brain Project gives public access to web-based simulation platforms

human brain project

HBP opens up all of its computing platforms to the wider research community as it looks to accelerate progress 

The Human Brain Project has released all six of its computing platforms to the wider research community and the general public in an attempt to accelerate progress.

People who are interested can now request access to any or all of the platforms, most of which are suitable for collaboration and accessible through the worldwide web.

The six platforms have the following titles: Neuroinformatics; Brain Simulation; High Performance Analytics and Computing; Medical Informatics; Neuromorphic Computing; and NeuroRobotics.  Continue reading Human Brain Project gives public access to web-based simulation platforms

IBM pilots robot as Hilton hotel concierge

Hilton Worldwide and IBM have introduced a robot concierge. “Connie” – based on Aldebaran’s Nao robot – is the first Watson-enabled robot concierge in the hospitality industry, claims IBM.

Connie draws on domain knowledge from Watson and WayBlazer to inform guests on local tourist attractions, dining recommendations and hotel features and amenities.

Connie, named for Hilton’s founder Conrad Hilton, marks the first time IBM has developed a Watson-enabled robot for the hospitality market. Connie will work side-by-side with Hilton’s Team Members to assist with visitor requests, personalize the guest experience and empower travelers with more information to help them plan their trips. Continue reading IBM pilots robot as Hilton hotel concierge