Perspective: Learning from urban mobility systems in the Middle East

dubai

By Ralf Baron, Thomas Kuruvilla, Morsi Berguiga, Michael Zintel, Joseph Salem, and Mario Kerbage

The Middle East may have been late to urbanization, but this has provided a unique opportunity to shape its urban mobility strategies.

Rather than adopting a piecemeal approach, leaders such as Dubai are following an ecosystem model that addresses mobility holistically.

In this article, contributed by experts at consultancy Arthur D Little, the authors explain this new model and the lessons it provides for other cities across the world as they struggle to meet their own urban mobility challenges.  Continue reading Perspective: Learning from urban mobility systems in the Middle East

Big feature: Historic opportunities presented by smart cities

city by the water

Experts from the Arthur D Little consultancy provide a detailed overview of the historic, “trillion-dollar” opportunity presented by the move to smart cities, in this article by Ralf Baron, Morsi Berguiga, Jaap Kalkman, Adnan Merhaba, Ansgar Schlautmann, Karim Taga

The 100 largest cities in the world produce 25 per cent of the planet’s wealth. To succeed, more and more cities are going “smart” in order to meet their biggest challenges and enrich the quality of their citizens’ lives.

This unstoppable trend is driving double-digit growth in a trillion-dollar global market.

What are the opportunities for telecom companies, utilities, financial institutions, transportation companies, software developers, equipment manufacturers and others in the smart-city market?  Continue reading Big feature: Historic opportunities presented by smart cities

Smart cities: A matrix of information superhighways

tokyo
Tokyo, the world’s most populous city, with almost 40 million residents. Picture by Moyan Brenn, via Wikimedia

Johannes Petrowisch, partner account manager at industrial automation software company Copa-Data, discusses the role of data collection and analysis in the smart cities of tomorrow

The largest ant colonies in the world contain over 300 million individuals and cover areas that are several kilometres wide. Ants mostly rely on tactile and chemical means of communication to keep these huge systems in order.

Luckily, as humans, we have additional tools at our disposal to make our homes and cities more efficient, more organised and, to put it simply, better places to live in.
Continue reading Smart cities: A matrix of information superhighways

Qualcomm signs up partners to develop smart cities and industrial applications

qualcomm snapdragon chipset

Qualcomm says a large number of companies have agreed to use its chipsets in their future technologies for smart cities and industrial applications 

Qualcomm Technologies says it has secured more than 100 design wins across more than 60 original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and module OEMs based on its MDM9x07 chipset family comprised of the Qualcomm Snapdragon X5 LTE (9×07) modem and MDM9207-1 modem for the Internet of Things (IoT).

The flexible chipset family offers security-focused and optimized cellular connectivity, as well as edge processing for a large array of devices and systems within the IoT.

These modems are designed to address customer connectivity and power challenges in a wide range of use cases including in:

  • smart cities;
  • commercial applications; and
  • industrial designs.

Continue reading Qualcomm signs up partners to develop smart cities and industrial applications

UK councils ‘not on track’ for smart city delivery, says new report

red telephone box london

Many local governments are lacking the budget, leadership and capability to progress smart initiatives and connected technology in cities across the UK.

This is the conclusion of a study by a company called Lucy Zodion, which surveyed almost 200 local authorities in Britain.

The research reveals that smart cities are not deemed a strategic priority for the majority of councils in the UK, and identifies barriers to delivery that are stifling progress in many local authorities.  Continue reading UK councils ‘not on track’ for smart city delivery, says new report

Most people don’t know what a smart city is, say engineers

future world
What the future might look like

IET calls for public engagement campaign around benefits of new technology

Only 18 per cent of the British public has heard of a “smart city”, according to research carried out by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). The research is reported in a new IET report, Smart Cities – Time to involve the people, which also reveals low interest in the technologies typically associated with smart cities. For example, only 8 per cent saw a value in being able to order driverless or electric transport from their smart phone.

Cities’ adoption of new technologies has traditionally involved little consultation with consumers. As a result, the report suggests that the public has yet to buy into the idea of smart cities – and be convinced of the value and benefits that technology, delivered on a city-scale, could bring to their daily lives.

New disruptive technologies and applications such as Uber (on-demand taxi services) and Airbnb (online accommodation service) may help to change hearts and minds, but the findings suggest there is still some way to go.  Continue reading Most people don’t know what a smart city is, say engineers