Ericsson and Zenuity to create network for self-driving cars

Networking company Ericsson is partnering with Zenuity, an automotive software development joint venture between Autoliv and Volvo, to develop a connectivity platform for cars.

Ericsson says the “end-to-end” platform will be for connected safety, advanced driver assistance systems, and autonomous driving software and functions.

In the first phase of the collaboration, Ericsson and Zenuity will work closely together to develop the Zenuity Connected Cloud – powered by Ericsson internet of things accelerator.  Continue reading Ericsson and Zenuity to create network for self-driving cars

Volvo and Autoliv to create joint venture to develop autonomous driving technology

volvo autoliv

Autoliv, a provider of advanced driver assistance systems, and Volvo Cars, the car maker, have agreed to form a new jointly-owned company to develop next generation autonomous driving software.

The planned new company will have its headquarters in Gothenburg, Sweden, and an initial workforce taken from both companies of around 200, increasing to over 600 in the medium term. The company is expected to start operations in early 2017.

Once finalized, the joint venture will be a new entrant in the growing global market for autonomous driving software systems. It will mark the first time a leading premium car maker has joined forces with a tier one supplier to develop new advanced driver assist systems and autonomous driving technologies.  Continue reading Volvo and Autoliv to create joint venture to develop autonomous driving technology

Advanced driver assistance systems trump driverless cars by stealth

While everyone seems fascinated by driverless cars brought to us via Silicon Valley, established suppliers of advanced driver assistance systems are quietly doing a roaring trade 

The automotive industry is going through some fundamental changes, mostly because of computer technology. 

The changes include higher levels of computer processing, fully driverless vehicles, greater levels of autonomy, internet connectivity, and the switch from petrol-powered combustion engines to electric.

It’s probably inevitable that the combustion engine will be gone from most mass-manufactured cars within a couple of decades, and will eventually only be seen in antique cars and supercars, although even some supercars are going electric.

Which means the road-going vehicle of the near-future will essentially be computers with wheels, connected to the cloud, and largely autonomous – or, in other words, a robot. In fact, this is what is already happening because of advanced driver assistance systems, or ADAS.  Continue reading Advanced driver assistance systems trump driverless cars by stealth