Top 10 additive manufacturing and 3D printing companies

Although we’ve called this a top 10, it’s not really in any particular order – it’s just a list of 10 of the most well-known and perhaps most highly regarded additive manufacturing or 3D printing companies. 

If anything, it’s an impressionistic understanding of the market, taking into consideration size of the company, number of clients and general reputation.

We have not included software-only companies or providers of marketplaces without any hardware of their own – we’ve tried to concentrate on companies which manufacture 3D printers and the materials that they require.  Continue reading Top 10 additive manufacturing and 3D printing companies

Airbus chooses Stratasys system to 3D print components for new aircraft

Stratasys has been chosen by Airbus to supply 3D printing and additive manufacturing systems for the production of components for aerospace company’s new plane. 

Airbus has already used the Stratasys FDM 3D Production System to produce 1,000 flight parts for use on its A350 XWB aircraft.

The 3D printed parts use a resin called Ultem 9085, which is certified to an Airbus material specifications to have a high strength to weight ratio and to be resistant to flame, smoke and toxicity – necessary for aircraft interiors.  Continue reading Airbus chooses Stratasys system to 3D print components for new aircraft

Renishaw 3D printing technology increases Land Rover BAR’s performance

land rover bar

Like many other cutting edge technologies – artificial intelligence, big data analytics – additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, has been incorporated into daily use at Land Rover Ben Ainslie Racing with the help of the team’s Technical Innovation Group.

In this case, TIG partner Renishaw, a global metrology firm which manufactures metal additive manufacturing machines, as well as working with the more familiar 3D printing in plastics for its own prototyping.

TIG project manager, George Sykes of PA Consulting, says: “We use 3D printing at three different levels within the team. The simplest level is as a prototyping and visualisation tool. We manufacture a large number of custom parts and 3D printing allows us to make full size prototypes in-house before we commit to a design.”  Continue reading Renishaw 3D printing technology increases Land Rover BAR’s performance

Renishaw and Dassault team up for integrated additive manufacturing

Dassault Systèmes catia

Engineering services provider Renishaw is collaborating with Dassault Systèmes, a 3D modelling, simulation and industrial operations software provider, as part of its commitment to provide and enhance software for metal additive manufacturing.

Users of Dassault Systèmes 3DExperience platform applications can now design, optimise, simulate and set up additive manufacturing builds directly for production on Renishaw’s additive manufacturing systems, which build 3D metal parts using laser powder bed fusion technology.  Continue reading Renishaw and Dassault team up for integrated additive manufacturing

Siemens, Strata and Etihad team up to create 3D printed interiors for planes

etihad

Siemens, Strata and Etihad Airways have signed an agreement to work together to develop the first 3D-printed parts for aircraft interiors in the Middle East and North Africa.

The partnership aims to “revolutionize” the aerospace industry, leveraging additive manufacturing, known as 3D printing, to help airlines to improve their designs, including making complex parts on demand and manufacturing discontinued parts.

Under the partnership, a pilot project will develop 3D printing solutions for aircraft cabin interior products for Etihad, the UAE’s national carrier.  Continue reading Siemens, Strata and Etihad team up to create 3D printed interiors for planes

Hannover Messe: Smart materials paving the way to 3D printing and to the ‘microfactory’

3d printed supercar

Get your complimentary ticket to Hannover Messe 2017

There may or may not be slight differences between what’s called “3D printing” and “additive manufacturing”, but essentially both are advanced techniques that could spell the end of assembly lines as we know them. 

It’s a widely known historic fact that giant car companies pioneered what we now known as the assembly line, where a product – such as a car or any other complex item – would move along production line, where different workers and teams of workers would do their jobs and eventually a finished product would be the result.

This process, however, is now being reconsidered in an age where customers are asking for increaing amounts of customisation and new technologies such as 3D printing and additive manufacturing are making this customisation possible.  Continue reading Hannover Messe: Smart materials paving the way to 3D printing and to the ‘microfactory’

Boeing completes prototype parts for 777X wing at new billion-dollar advanced manufacturing facility

boeing 777x

Boeing says it has completed prototype parts for the wing of its new 777X Dreamliner aircraft

The company is using advanced manufacturing methods, including additive or 3D printing, in the construction of the passenger plane at its new $1 billion Everett, Washington facility.

When completed, the wing for the 777X will be the largest wing Boeing has ever built.  Continue reading Boeing completes prototype parts for 777X wing at new billion-dollar advanced manufacturing facility

OR Laser claims its 3D printing method will innovate jewellery industry

3d printed jewellery
3D printing can produce complex shapes but the finishing when it comes to metal has not so far matched traditional manufacturing methods

OR Laser believes the jewellery industry will be the main beneficiary of Orlas Creator

OR Laser believes it is on the cusp of further innovate the jewellery industry with the introduction of its new and accessible metal additive manufacturing system, the Orlas Creator. 

OR says its Orlas Creator offers an “economically profitable” metal system with “superior speed and productivity gains by way of its unique” circular build-platform design in combination with a proprietary, rotation-led precision coater blade that will bring new value creation opportunities for jewellery brands.

During its 30-year history, 3D printing has already caused some serious disruption within the jewellery industry by facilitating new approaches to jewellery design and manufacturing.  Continue reading OR Laser claims its 3D printing method will innovate jewellery industry

Lowering the entry barriers of additive manufacturing

renishaw

Marc Saunders, director of Renishaw’s Global Solutions Centre, explains how additive manufacturing is moving from the world of rapid prototyping into series production

A famous quote attributed to Benjamin Franklin says: “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.”

Although in reality Franklin never said these words, the quote has become extremely popular because its message resonates with anyone who has ever tried to make sense of new technology.

To a large extent, the quote also applies perfectly to additive manufacturing (AM).  Continue reading Lowering the entry barriers of additive manufacturing

OR Laser launches new metal additive manufacturing system

or laser orlas creator

OR Laser has launched a new direct metal additive manufacturing system which it says is “more accessible and more affordable for more companies”.

The company says the Orlas Creator metal additive manufacturing platform is “smarter, simpler, faster and more cost effective than any other metal additive manufacturing system currently available on the market”.

OR Laser says the system uses a “unique” circular build-platform design, which enables up to 30per cent faster production speeds compared with comparable platforms. These speeds are facilitated by a proprietary, rotation-led precision coater blade.  Continue reading OR Laser launches new metal additive manufacturing system

Additive manufacturing: Renishaw to showcase new technologies

robot-bike-co

Renishaw to demonstrate new tech for additive manufacturing process chain at formnext 2016

Global engineering and technology company Renishaw will showcase its latest developments and highlight the role that metal additive manufacturing plays in the manufacturing process chain at formnext, taking place between the 15th and 18th of November, 2016, in Frankfurt, Germany.

Renishaw will exhibit in Hall 3.1, on stand F68. Highlights on the stand will include a Moto 2 motorcycle and the Robot Bike Company R160 bespoke mountain bike frame, one of the latest innovations to come out of Renishaw’s global network of Solutions Centres.

The show comes soon after the inauguration of the first of Renishaw’s Solutions Centres, a global network of facilities aimed at making metal additive manufacturing more accessible to industry.  Continue reading Additive manufacturing: Renishaw to showcase new technologies

Additive manufacturing or 3D printing? What’s the difference?

“Additive manufacturing” is increasingly used interchangeably with “3D printing”, so they essentially mean the same thing. The only difference seems to be that “3D printing” is used more by maker communities – hobbyists and inventors – and still retains some sort of novelty value, whereas “additive manufacturing” – despite being the newer term – is more likely to be preferred in industry circles, perhaps because it has the sound of an established technology. 

But it’s not really an “established” technology in the sense that it’s only been around for a relatively short time.

According to 3DPrintingIndustry.com, it was only in 2007 that a 3D printer was available for less than $10,000 – from a company called 3D Systems, which is today one of the most well-known providers of the technology.

The most advanced 3D printers still cost quite a lot of money, especially those used by high-end manufacturers, but there are good-quality, entry-level machines available today for as little as a few hundred dollars.  Continue reading Additive manufacturing or 3D printing? What’s the difference?

Renishaw to present latest in advanced manufacturing technology at IMTS

renishaw am 500 3d printing machine

Renishaw, one of the world’s leading engineering and scientific technology companies, will present the latest thinking and developments in metal additive manufacturing at the 2016 Additive Manufacturing Conference (AMC), September 13-14, at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. 

Marc Saunders, director of Renishaw’s global solutions centres, will deliver a talk on industrialising additive manufacturing at 11am, on Wednesday 14th September, Room W375B.

Marc will explore the chains of linked processes and tools that are required to create an integrated manufacturing process with AM at its heart, and the controls that must be employed to make AM a mainstream manufacturing process.

This year’s AMC is co-located with the International Manufacturing Technology Show (ITMS), where Renishaw will be exhibiting its additive manufacturing systems and metrology products on Booth E-5509.  Continue reading Renishaw to present latest in advanced manufacturing technology at IMTS

OR Laser develops additive manufacturing which enables ‘fast modification of molds’

or laser additive manufacturing powder jet welding small

OR Laser says it has built a welding solution which can be equipped with a powder nozzle for additive manufacturing 

Direct metal deposition (DMD) can be up to 250 to 330 per cent faster than manual laser cladding.

New Additive Manufacturing 2.0 (AM 2.0)-capable laser welding systems can now be equipped with a recently developed powder nozzle from OR Lasertechnologie  that permits fully automatic layerwise buildup.

This solution holds enormous potential for tool and mold making applications at small and midsized companies.  Continue reading OR Laser develops additive manufacturing which enables ‘fast modification of molds’

Airbus and Renishaw team up to develop ‘innovative design approach to meet future demand for new aircraft’

airbus

Renishaw is contributing its additive manufacturing expertise to a new £17.7 million project, being led by Airbus in the UK, to develop an innovative way of designing and manufacturing aircraft wings, which will encourage a “right first time approach” and reduce development time. 

More than 30,000 new aircraft are expected to be required in the next 15-20 years, replacing existing in-service models and also to expand airlines’ fleets as the number of air travellers increases. 

The project, called Wing Design Methodology Validation – or Windy – has been made possible thanks to joint industry and UK government investment from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), supported by the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI). It was one of a number of projects announced by BEIS during the Farnborough International Airshow.  Continue reading Airbus and Renishaw team up to develop ‘innovative design approach to meet future demand for new aircraft’