Samsung reveals new Drvline platform for autonomous driving

Samsung Electronics has introduced its new Samsung Drvline platform, positioning itself as the go-to partner for Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) and Mobility as a Service (MaaS) providers in the autonomous driving market.

The Drvline platform is an open, modular, and scalable hardware and software-based platform, which is a valuable solution for automakers because it can integrate best-in-class technology into new vehicles, while also building a foundation for fleets of the future.

“The cars of tomorrow won’t just change how we get around, they’ll transform our streets and society. They’ll bring mobility to people who need it, make our roads safer, and revolutionise our communities,” said Young Sohn, President and Chief Strategy Officer at Samsung Electronics, and Chairman of the Board at Harman.  Continue reading Samsung reveals new Drvline platform for autonomous driving

Infineon partners with Baidu on Apollo program for autonomous driving development

Infineon Technologies and Baidu have announced at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas that Infineon is joining the Apollo Program of Baidu.

Based on Baidu’s ability in AI and autonomous driving, as well as Infineon’s advantage in automotive electronics hardware platforms, both parties will cooperate in depth to promote rapid development of autonomous driving technology to improve people’s intelligent life.

Marking an important fusion of Infineon’s automotive electronics ecosystem and the Apollo automotive ecosystem built by Baidu, the cooperation will create more opportunities for both parties’ partners to join hands to promote the progress of the intelligent automotive industry.  Continue reading Infineon partners with Baidu on Apollo program for autonomous driving development

David v Goliath in Chinese car market: Nio’s powerful slingshot

By Edward Tse, Gao Feng Advisory

The Chinese vehicle market is not only the largest in the world (sales of 28 million units in 2016) but it also offers the highest number of brands (130).

More and more new players – most of them local producers – are entering the field.

Globally China is establishing itself not only as the leading market for new-energy vehicles, but also for connectivity, autonomous driving and totally new mobility concepts.  Continue reading David v Goliath in Chinese car market: Nio’s powerful slingshot

Denso and Symbio to establish technology innovation center in Finland

Denso, one of the world’s largest suppliers of robotics and automation technologies, is partnering with software company Symbio to establish a technology innovation centre in Finland.

Denso, the main supplier to Toyota and one of the leading automotive component manufacturers in general, says the innovation center in Finland is a joint enterprise based at Symbio’s premises in Espoo, Finland.

Symbio is a technology research and development company with expertise in robotics, automation and internet of things systems.

It’s likely that the first products to emerge from the collaboration will relate to connected, autonomous and electric cars and other vehicles.  Continue reading Denso and Symbio to establish technology innovation center in Finland

SoftBank to invest $10 billion in Uber

SoftBank is highly likely to go ahead with its plan to invest $10 billion in Uber, the ride-hailing app company, according to a report on CNet.com

An Uber representative quoted by CNet says: “We’ve entered into an agreement with a consortium led by SoftBank and Dragoneer on a potential investment.

“We believe this agreement is a strong vote of confidence in Uber’s long-term potential. Upon closing, it will help fuel our investments in technology and our continued expansion at home and abroad, while strengthening our corporate governance.”  Continue reading SoftBank to invest $10 billion in Uber

‘Virtual dashboard’ sounds better than ‘human-machine interface’

A human-machine interface is a computer screen through which a human can control a machine. It can be a screen on a tablet computer or a desktop computer, or even a wearable, like a smartwatch.

The majority of HMIs in the industrial sector take the form of tablet computers, though there are also many desktop HMIs, and an increasing number of developers are releasing wearable HMIs, although they are few in number at the moment.

The reason why mobile HMIs seem to be favoured is that they can be located near the machine, or the user can be near the machine when using the device, to either directly control it in realtime or programme it to perform whatever operations at a subsequent time.  Continue reading ‘Virtual dashboard’ sounds better than ‘human-machine interface’